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The Ultimate Guide to Writing an Outstanding Law School Personal Statement

Dazzle Admissions with Your Legally Awesome Personal Story
Apr 2, 2023

Introduction

Let's face it: you've spent countless hours studying and acing the LSAT, and now it's time for the pièce de résistance – the law school personal statement. This is your golden opportunity to showcase your personality, and put your best legal foot forward. But don't worry, this guide has got you covered. In no time, you'll be writing a personal statement that could put John Grisham's early drafts to shame.

If you're ready to convince law school admissions committees that you're the next Ruth Bader Ginsburg or Thurgood Marshall, then buckle up and get ready for a wild ride through the world of crafting the ultimate law school personal statement.

1. Know Your Audience: The Admissions Committee

First and foremost, remember that you're writing for the admissions committee. These are the gatekeepers of your future legal career, and they've read more personal statements than there are citations in a Supreme Court decision. To avoid becoming a legal footnote in their memory, keep the following in mind:

  1. Be professional, but also relatable. You don't want to sound like a robot that's been programmed to spout legalese.
  2. Avoid clichés like "I want to make a difference" or "I've always wanted to be a lawyer." Unless, of course, you've been dreaming of billable hours since you were in diapers.
  3. Consider what makes you unique. Remember, this is your chance to stand out among a sea of applicants with equally impressive academic records and LSAT scores.

2. Choosing Your Topic: Make It Personal and Memorable

When it comes to choosing a topic for your personal statement, think of it as an episode of Law & Order: Your Life Edition. It's your moment to shine, so pick a story that showcases your passion, resilience, or commitment to justice. Consider these tips:

  1. Use an anecdote. Admissions committees love a good story, especially one that shows your problem-solving skills or ability to navigate tricky situations. Just be sure not to end up on the wrong side of the law!
  2. Reflect on a transformative experience. If you've had a life-changing event that led you to pursue law, share it! Just remember to keep it PG-rated.
  3. Discuss a personal challenge you've overcome. Nothing says "I'm ready for law school" like demonstrating your resilience in the face of adversity.

3. Structure and Organization: Your Legal Blueprint

Now that you've chosen your topic, it's time to draft your personal statement. Like a well-organized legal brief, your statement should have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Consider the following tips for structuring your masterpiece:

  1. Begin with a strong opening. Start with a hook that will capture the reader's attention and make them want to keep reading. Think of it as your own personal Miranda warning: "You have the right to remain captivated."
  2. Develop your story in the body. This is where you'll expand on your anecdote or experience, and explain how it has shaped your desire to pursue a legal career. Remember to be concise and avoid meandering – this isn't a filibuster.
  3. End with a powerful conclusion. Tie everything together and reiterate why you're the ideal candidate for law school. Just like a closing argument, leave the admissions committee convinced that you're the right choice.

4. Style and Tone: Finding Your Inner Legal Wordsmith

When it comes to your personal statement, you want to strike the perfect balance between professional and engaging. After all, no one wants to read a 500-word legal treatise on why you should be admitted to law school. To achieve this delicate balance, follow these style and tone guidelines:

  1. Write in the first person. This is your personal statement, so own it! Using "I" allows you to convey your unique perspective and voice.
  2. Keep it conversational, yet polished. Write as if you were speaking to a respected mentor or professor. Avoid slang, but don't be afraid to inject a bit of your personality into your writing.
  3. Employ dry humor sparingly. A little wit can make your statement more enjoyable to read, but remember that humor is subjective. It's best to err on the side of caution, lest you inadvertently offend the admissions committee.
  4. Be precise and concise. Legal writing is known for its clarity and brevity, so practice these skills in your personal statement. Aim to keep it between 500 and 700 words, as brevity is the soul of wit (and law school applications).

5. Revision: The Art of Legal Editing

It's been said that writing is rewriting, and this is particularly true for your personal statement. Once you've drafted your masterpiece, it's time to don your editor's hat and polish it to perfection. Follow these tips for a meticulous revision:

  1. Take a break before revising. Give yourself some distance from your statement before diving into revisions. This will help you approach it with fresh eyes and a clear mind.
  2. Read your statement out loud. This technique can help you catch awkward phrasing, run-on sentences, and other errors that might not be apparent when reading silently.
  3. Seek feedback from others. Share your statement with trusted friends, family members, or mentors who can provide constructive criticism. Just remember, opinions are like law school casebooks – everyone's got one, but you don't have to take them all to heart.
  4. Edit ruthlessly. Don't be afraid to cut, rewrite, or reorganize your statement. Your goal is to make your writing as strong and effective as possible, even if it means sacrificing a clever turn of phrase or an endearing anecdote.

6. Proofread: The Final Verdict

Before submitting your personal statement, it's crucial to proofread it thoroughly. Even the most compelling story can be marred by typos, grammatical errors, or other mistakes. Follow these proofreading tips to ensure your statement is error-free:

  1. Use spell check, but don't rely on it entirely. Some errors, like homophones or subject-verb agreement issues, may slip past your computer's watchful eye.
  2. Print your statement and read it on paper. This can help you spot errors that you might have missed on-screen.
  3. Enlist a second pair of eyes. Sometimes, a fresh perspective can catch mistakes that you've become blind to after multiple revisions.

Conclusion

Crafting an outstanding law school personal statement may seem daunting, but with the right approach and a healthy dose of perseverance, you can create a compelling and memorable statement that will impress even the most discerning admissions committee. So go forth and conquer, future legal eagles! And remember, as you embark on your law school journey, may the precedent be ever in your favor.

cryptanon HLS '22 & LSD creator

Tech-focused creator of LSD.Law. I built LSD while applying to law school. I saw unequal access to knowledge and built LSD to level the playing field and help applicants make thoughtful, well-informed decisions in the application process.

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trees1234567
12:40
than I have been so fat
trees1234567
12:40
far
trees1234567
12:40
though the schools I want were only briefly touched on
KnowledgeableRitzyWasp
12:40
i didn’t read it what was it saying?
manifestmoreadmissions
12:43
it basically is expecting more WL movement especially in lower ranked schools. There is already more WL movement than there usually is at this point in the season, so the summer melt should theoretically also create larger WL movement
manifestmoreadmissions
12:43
for those that got fordham Rs did you have any status checker change?
lower ranked schools such as Rutgers??
KnowledgeableRitzyWasp
12:44
ooh perfect, good to see more WL movement
manifestmoreadmissions
12:45
@waitlistmovementwillhappen: here's the post: https://www.reddit.com/r/lawschooladmissions/comments/1dit4j6/waitlist_data_diveschool_info_incl_spivey_data/
@manifestmoreadmissions: ty!
trees1234567
12:48
can someone comment about berkeley on there
manifestmoreadmissions
12:49
the ~one~ thing ill say about these conclusions is that this year seems to have a significant number of applicants who just didn't get admitted into any schools. if they get off the WL then that doesn't necessarily free a spot anywhere. idk if it's more people or fewer people than previous years so maybe its irrelevant but idk food for thought i guess. overall yeah this is making me hopeful
well I called my WL and they were really nice, gave me some hope lol
trees1234567
13:08
which one!
Rutgers lol sorry not one of the top ones
manifestmoreadmissions
13:09
that's still awesome!!
trees1234567
13:09
nah was not asking for myself
trees1234567
13:09
was asking to be excited for you!
manifestmoreadmissions
13:09
did you guys know that jerry springer has a JD from northwestern
he opened my file just from my number and said yeah you're still in consideration after our latest review :')
manifestmoreadmissions
13:12
oh that is sweet
KnowledgeableRitzyWasp
13:15
ooh still in consideration is really solid
yes! holding on to this little bit of hope as I keep waiting
[] ararara
13:17
Such a beautiful day! So many smiling faces! Hang in there people. We’ve got this!
does anybody else feel like they're going more insane now that we're seeing some more WL movement? I feel like I'm being just as neurotic as I was Nov-April checking my email and reddit and here non-stop
lol yup^
KnowledgeableRitzyWasp
13:40
waitlist kind of sucks cause you have to check your email every day or you might miss your chance
13:45
do you guys not check your email every day?
13:46
what kinds of lives are you living?
amlaw
13:49
i laughed out loud
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